Beef you can stand behind

Whether you are looking for mouth-watering steaks or a roast to wow guests at a dinner party, we have you covered. Because quality is something you can taste, we go to great lengths to ensure our beef products come from healthy cows living in wholesome environments. Because happy cows make for happy customers.

All Lowline Angus are raised by the McMahons, our meat partners / friends / neighbors who live just up the road from Field and Farm co.

Our Commitment to quality:

- GRASS FED (on a small scale farm, amidst real pasture, in actual sunshine)

- GRASS FINISHED (cattle forage and graze for their own fresh food)

- NO ANTIBIOTICS (no need, when the cows live in natural conditions)

The cows are rotationally grazed on open-pasture and have had no exposure whatsoever to hormones, solutions, injections or antibiotics. All meat is processed locally in New Glarus, in a federally inspected meat facility.

All beef products will be delivered to you frozen, which allows for storage of up to one year, without any change in quality or Flavor.

See below For an idea of what each cut offers:

 
 
Arm Roast.jpg

Arm Roast

This roast comes from the muscular shoulder area of a cow and is a lean cut of meat.

Slow cooking methods are best when preparing an arm roast, so we recommend that you braise it and then throw it in a crockpot to tenderize.

 
Beef Brisket.jpg

Beef Brisket

Brisket comes from the lower breast of a cow and is one of the most fLavorful cuts of meat.

Because this cut is characteristically thick and coarse-grained, it requires a cooking method that allows for low temps for an extended period of time. We recommend slow cooking it in a barbecue, smoker or crockpot.

 
Chuck Roast.jpg

Chuck Roast

Chuck comes from the forequarter and consists of parts of the neck, shoulder blade and upper arm. Chuck is a great choice for beef stew or pot roast.

Slow cooking methods are best when preparing a chuck roast, so we recommend that you braise it and then throw it in a crockpot to tenderize.

 
Ground Beef.png

Ground Beef

This one probably doesn’t warrant much explanation, other than to say it receives rave reviews from our members!

 
Porterhouse.jpg

Porterhouse

These steaks come from the hindquarter, particularly the short lion, which is where the most desirable cuts of meat originate.

Dry heat cooking of any type (grilling of frying) is best for these tender cuts. Lightly season to enjoy the full body of fLavor.

 
Ribeye Raw.jpg

Ribeye

These steaks come from the top part of the center section of the rib. They are tender and full of fLavor.

Most methods of cooking work for these- you can roast, broil, barbecue, grill or fry these with ease!

 
Rump Roast.png

Rump Roast

As you may image, the rump comes from… the lower hind of the cow. These muscles are lean because they get a lot of exercise.

We recommend that you cook these slowly and serve medium rare. Be sure to cut against the grain and slice thinly.

 
Sirloin Steak.jpg

Sirloin Steak

These steaks come from a large section of the cow that runs from the 13th rib to the hipbone, including all muscle from the backbone to the belly.

You can’t go wrong when grilling sirloin.

 
Sirloin Tip.jpg

Sirloin Tip

Separate from the top sirloin, the bottom sirloin is divided into three sections, which produces a number of cuts, including the tri-tip, ball tip, and fLap.

Our recommendation for sirloin tips is to roast or barbecue.

 
Soup Bones.jpg

Soup Bones

Have you ever tried your hand at homemade broth?

Our favorite recipe calls for roasting in the oven fIrst, then adding bones and drippings to a slow cooker fIlled with veggies and herbs. strain the broth and store for up to one month in the freezer.

 
Stew Meat.jpg

Stew Meat

If you are making bone broth, it’s a simple addition to the recommendation above to get a hearty stew in the process!

Just add these bits of meat to the slow cooker, shred and enjoy!

 
T-bone.jpg

T-Bone

Along with the Porterhouse, These steaks come from the short lion hindquarter, which is where the most desirable cuts of meat originate.

Dry heat cooking of any type (grilling of frying) is best for these tender cuts. Lightly season to enjoy the full body of fLavor.

 
Tenderized Round.jpg

Tenderized Round

These steaks come from the same section as the rump roast.

We recommend that you cook these slowly and serve medium rare. Be sure to cut against the grain and slice thinly.

 
Tenderloin.jpg

Tenderloin

The tenderloin runs from the short loin back into the sirloin and produces some of the fInest steaks available.

Similar to the sirloin steak, we recommend that you grill or fry with light seasoning to capture every nuance of the flavor profIle.